thehighshelf:

slaybelle:

Aaaand, go fuck yourself.

I hate this attitude of ‘well, somewhere in the world, someone has it worse’ because it’s such a brush off. Reasonable adults should be able to agree that, yes, somewhere in the world other injustices are being committed while at the same time retaining sympathy for injustices being committed in front of them.

Empathy is not a zero sum game.

I really wish it was possible to ask these people, “Should your rape be ignored?” and/or “Was your rape ignored?”  But I know it would blow up and there would be no real discussion, I’d be accused of wishing they were raped or some other bs.

I assume the answer to the first question is “no”. Regarding the second question, I often find myself wondering if these aren’t comments from women who are “nice” and “good” who were assaulted in the past but just stuffed it down and pasted a smile on their faces.  ”I shut up about what happened to me, so you better not complain because I’m good and you are not worth more than me!” It’s just so crazy.

Or maybe it’s simple silencing.  One of Ladyblog’s favorite activities is shutting women up.

In theory, I agree with her second statement. I can think of numerous situations in which I might not have total control of my body during childbirth, but there’s no reason to accept it as a minor inconvenience. Bodily autonomy has been a hallmark of the feminist movement for decades. That control is not limited to whether or not to carry a child to term.

What I tend to find, generally, in people who toss out statements like this, is that they’re primarily intellectually lazy. They have an idea in their head (in this case —“women in 3rd world countries have it worse in childbirth”) that they are unwilling to think past.

Women are upset about the loss of autonomy during childbirth? BAM! Women in other countries have it worse!

Women in the US are worried about the rising rates of c-sections? BAM! Women in 3rd world countries have it worse!

Having to hold these two separate ideas in their head and give them both validation is tough. You have to think past your own kneejerkiness and engage the question, and, quite possibly, form an actual opinion on it.

And that’s hard. Like math. Or at least that’s what Barbie used to tell me.

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